Book Critique of MARY, The Church at the Source by Ratzinger and Balthasar

Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger

HAIL, FULL OF GRACE – Elements of Marian Piety According to the Bible

Pages 61-62: “From henceforth all generations will call me blessed” – these words of the Mother of Jesus handed on for us by Luke (Lk 1:48) are at once a prophecy and a charge laid upon the Church of all times. This phrase from the Magnificat, the spirit-filled prayer of praise that Mary addresses to the living God, is thus one of the principal foundations of Christian devotion to her. The Church invented nothing new of her own when she began to extol Mary; she did not plummet from the worship of the one God to the praise of man. The Church does what she must; she carries out the task assigned her from the beginning. At the time Luke was writing this text, the second generation of Christianity had already arrived, and the “family” of the Jews had been joined by that of the Gentiles, who had been incorporated into the Church of Jesus Christ. The expression “all generations, all families” was beginning to be filled with historical reality. The Evangelist would certainly not have transmitted Mary’s prophecy if it had seemed to him an indifferent or obsolete item. He wished in his Gospel to record “with care” what “the eyewitnesses and ministers of the word” (Lk 1:2-3) had handed on from the beginning, in order to give the faith of Christianity, which was then striding onto the stage of world history, a reliable guide for its future course. Mary’s prophecy numbered among those elements he had “carefully” ascertained and consisted important enough to transmit to posterity. This fact assumes that Mary’s words were guaranteed by reality: the first two chapters of Luke’s Gospel give evidence of a sphere of tradition in which the remembrance of Mary was cultivated and the Mother of the Lord was loved and praised. They presuppose that the still somewhat na´ve exclamation of the unnamed woman, “blessed is the womb that bore you” (Lk 11:27), had not entirely ceased to resound but, as Jesus was more deeply understood, had likewise attained a purer form that more adequately expressed its content. They presuppose that Elizabeth’s greeting, “blessed are you among women” (Lk 1:42), which Luke characterizes as words spoken in the Holy Spirit (Lk 1:41), had not been a once-only episode. The continued existence of such praise at least in one strand of early Christian tradition is the basis of Luke’s infancy narrative. The recording of these words in the Gospel raises this veneration of Mary from historical fact to a commission laid upon the Church of all places and all times.
Note: Should a sinner be venerated? Mary needed a Savior thereby acknowledging her sin nature.
And Mary said: “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit has rejoiced in God my Savior.” Luke 1:46-47.
Note: The name of Mary, the mother of Jesus Christ, is not mentioned in Luke after chapter 2.

Pages 62-63: The Church neglects one of the duties enjoined upon her when she does not praise Mary. She deviates from the word of the Bible when her Marian devotion falls silent. When this happens, in fact, the Church no longer even glorifies God as she ought. For though we do know God by means of his creation – “Ever since the creation of the world (God’s) invisible nature, namely, his eternal power and deity, has been clearly perceived in the things that have been made” (Rom 1:20) – we also know him, and know him more intimately, through the history he has shared with man. Just as the history of a man’s life and the relationships he has formed reveal what kind of person he is, God shows himself in a history, in men through whom his own character can be seen. This is so true that he can be “named” through them and identified in them: the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob. Through his relation with men, through the faces of men, God has made himself accessible and has shown his face. We cannot try to bypass these human faces in order to get to God alone, in his “pure form”, as it were. This would lead us to a God of our own invention in place of the real God; it would be an arrogant purism that regards its own ideas as more important than God’s deeds. The above-cited verse of the Magnificat shows us that Mary is one of the human beings who in an altogether special way belong to the name of God, so much so, in fact, that we cannot praise him rightly if we leave her out of account. In doing so we forget something about him that must not be forgotten. What, exactly? Our first attempt at an answer could be his maternal side, which reveals itself more purely and more directly in the Son’s Mother than anywhere else. But this is, of course, much too general. In order to praise Mary correctly and thus to glorify God correctly, we must listen to all that Scripture and tradition say concerning the Mother of the Lord and ponder it in our hearts. Thanks to the praise of “all generations” since the beginning, the abundant wealth of Mariology has become almost too vast to survey. In this brief meditation, I would like to help the reader reflect anew on just a few of the key words Saint Luke has placed in our hands in his inexhaustibly rich infancy narrative.
Note: Disciples of Jesus Christ never gave praise to Mary in the Word of God.
Then, as He was now drawing near the descent of the Mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works they had seen, saying: “‘Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord!’ Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” Luke 19:37-38.
Note: Why does the Roman Catholic church draw from traditions of men for its heresies?

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