Norway Muslim Cleric Hate

Cleric Jailed in Norway for Praising Paris Attack

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OCT. 30, 2015

COPENHAGEN, Denmark A Norwegian court has sentenced an Iraqi-born cleric to 18 months in jail for praising the slaying of cartoonists at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, which had lampooned Islam and other religions.

The Oslo city court also found Najmaddin Faraj Ahmad, known as Mullah Krekar, guilty of urging others to kill a Kurdish immigrant in Norway in the same interview with Norwegian broadcaster NRK.

"Whoever offends our religion and our honor must understand that this is a conflict about life and death," Ahmad told NRK, adding a cartoonist is "a fighting heathen whom it is permissible to kill." The interview was broadcast Feb. 26 the day after he was arrested.

On Jan. 7, two Islamic extremists attacked the paper in Paris, leaving 12 people dead. A second attack two days later on a Kosher grocery store in the French capital killed five others. All three gunmen died in clashes with police.

Ahmad also was ordered to pay 75,000 kroner ($8,750) in compensation to Halmat Goran, the Kurdish immigrant .

Throughout the trial, Ahmad denied any wrongdoing, arguing his statements were an interpretation of Sharia law.

Earlier this year, Ahmad was freed after nearly three years' imprisonment for making death threats. The 59-year-old Kurd, who came to Norway as a refugee in 1991, was convicted in 2005 for a similar offense.

His lawyer, Brynjar Meling, said they have not decided whether to appeal.

Norway and the United States have accused Ahmad of financing a defunct Iraqi Sunni insurgent group called Ansar al-Islam. It reportedly merged with the Islamic State group last year.


Cleric threatens Norway with 'punishment'

OSLO, Norway | September 07, 2005 11:12:08 AM IST

A Muslim cleric who faces deportation from Norway says that the country could be punished if he is forced out.

Mullah Krekar, in an interview with the al-Jazeera television network, said that sending him to Iraq would be an offense that shouldn't be made without punishment.

I have faith in Allah, he told al-Jazeera. I defend my rights in their court just like Western people defend their rights. I am patient like they are patient. But if my patience runs out, I will react like Orientals do.

The Iraqi-born Krekar, whose real name is Najmuddin Faraj Ahmad, and his family have been living in Norway since 1991. Krekar reportedly has made trips back to Iraq recently and helped found the Islamist group Ansar al-Islam.

In his interview, Krekar also attacked Erna Solberg, the Cabinet minister who signed a deportation order in 2003. He accused Solberg of risking his life to satisfy her adolescent political visions.

(UPI)

 

Muslim cleric says Islam will finally win
By UPI
Mar 13, 2006, 19:00 GMT

OSLO, Norway (UPI) -- A controversial Muslim refugee in Norway predicts Islam will eventually triumph in what he calls the war between his religion and the West, reports Aftenposten.

Speaking to the Oslo newspaper, Mullah Krekar, who came from Iraq, said: \'We`re the ones who will change you. Just look at the development within Europe, where the number of Muslims is expanding like mosquitoes.

"Every western woman in the (European Union) is producing an average of 1.4 children. Every Muslim woman in the same countries (is) producing 3.5 children. By 2050, 30 percent of the population in Europe will be Muslim."

Krekar said the Islamic way of thinking will prove more powerful than that of the West, the report said. He said \'materialism, egoism and wildness\' has altered Christianity.

Krekar, who faces deportation after being deemed a threat to national security, was quoted as saying al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden is considered a terrorist only because he lacks his own state.

"Those who say Osama bin Laden is a terrorist are themselves killing our women and children," Krekar said.

 

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